Welcome to the official FNFVF Inc. Website

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Welcome to the Official Website of First Nations Film and Video Festival Inc.

The mission of First Nations Film and Video Festival is to advocate for and celebrate the works of Native Americans filmmakers and new works and films that break racial stereotypes and promotes awareness of Native American issues. All films screened are directed by Indigenous/Native American filmmakers from the United States, Canada, Central and South America, and Mexico.

The mission of First Nations Film and Video Festival Inc. is to support Indigenous/Native American filmmakers of all skill levels and work to provide them a venue for their works and voice.

FNFVF Inc runs two annual film festivals a year at various venues across Chicago, surrounding suburbs, and beyond. The festivals take place:

MAY 1 – 10 & NOVEMBER 1 -10 every year.

A STATEMENT FROM FNFVF INC.

Black lives matter.

Let this statement be said first and foremost.

First Nations Film and Video Festival Inc stands in support with Black Lives Matter and in support of any movement for the attainment of equality and justice for marginalized and repressed communities.

Be well. Stay safe. Keep working for justice.

With respect,

Ernest M Whiteman III (Northern Arapaho)
Director, FNFVF Inc

Board of First Nations Film and Video Festival, Inc:
BC Echohawk (Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma)
Samantha Garcia (Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe)
Don Nole (Bad River Band – Chippewa)
Janie Pochel (Oji-Cree)
Christine Recloud (White Earth Ojibwe) (Member 2011-2021)
Winfield Woundedeye (Northern Cheyenne and Ojibwe) – FNFVF Youth Ambassador

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You can  “Like” us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! You can also see what our FNFVF Director is up to!

FNFVF, Inc. is a 501c3 tax-exempt organization thanks to the Chicago Arts Assistance Grant from the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency, which supported our 501c3 tax-exempt application.

Thanks also to the Crossroads Fund for their invaluable support:

You can support the First Nations Film and Video Festival and help us support Native American Filmmakers! To continue your support click the DONATE button below. Thank you for your support of Native American Movie Makers across North America.

 

FILMS SPOTLIGHT – DAY SEVEN

FILMS SPOTLIGHT – DAY SEVEN

The Spring 2022 FNFVF concludes with a closing online film program. Tonight’s films are:

Runs Through Their Blood: A Life Impacted, directed by Helen DJ Pyette & Angela Lewis (M’Chigeeng First Nation, Sheshegwaning First Nation, Serpent River First Nation, Ontario Canada)
RUNS THROUGH THEIR BLOOD: A Life Impacted documents the effects of intergenerational trauma through the history of residential schools and how it is a part of the everyday lives of the community and how a community is moving forward to change.

Holy Mother Earth, directed by Benjamín Romero (Hñähñú Nation, México)
Mäkä Hmu Hai (Holy Mother Earth) is a portrait about the veneration of the Holy Land guided by the elders of the Otomí people of Tenango de Doria, Hidalgo. The search to rescue the traditions of the people and keep the culture alive is carried out by Don Braulio and Doña Claudia and the butlers Don Beto and Doña Elvira, who have the function of organizing and making known to their people the roots of their culture and how these fade with the current economic demands in Mexico.

Our closing feature will be:
Seven Ridges directed by Antonio Coello (Chiapanecan-Spanish)
In a desert by the sea, a culture survives modernity. A grandmother and her granddaughter intertwine in estrangement over memory. The myth sheds controversy; time falls in dreams of sand, old songs and rock music.

 

Join us once more time tonight in viewing these films. You can GET YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE. For those who got their tickets for prior programs, you can still use those to view tonight’s program with us

That is it for the Spring 2022 FNFVF. We wish to thank every one of the filmmakers for trusting us with their voice and work and in getting their films to audiences. We thank everyone who attended the in-person or the online events. We are glad that even though we are in a weird spot in dealing with the current pandemic, that you made time to see the films. You are a necessary part of that storytelling circle.

Thanks to Raul at the Comfort Station and Angela with Chicago Public Library in helping us set up two great venues. Look for more info on our next program in the “Fine, We’ll Do It Ourselves: Online Panel Discussion Series – “What We Must Never Do is Steal from Ourselves”: Natives Appropriating Natives”. Stay tuned.

Thanks again and we hope to see you again soon.

 

FILMS SPOTLIGHT – DAY SIX

FILMS SPOTLIGHT – DAY SIX

The Spring 2022 FNFVF continues with another in-person program at the Bezazian Library in Uptown. The program begins at 2:30pm. Daylight program includes another new feature film:

Something Inside Is Broken
Directed by Jack Kohler (Hoopa Tribal Member)
This Native American Music Award winning pre-gold rush era rock opera, based on actual historical events, focuses on the untold story of how Natives were slaves under Johann Sutter’s Mexican reign. Slave hunters scoured Northern California to supply Sutter with young native girls and boys. Captain Fremont and Kit Carson massacred hundreds of natives prior to the Bear Flag Revolt and the Mexican American war. With relevant modern themes and dehumanizing media practices, this conflict is cleverly woven into our dark American history. The crazed ambition for gold, the objectification of women, the disregard for minority groups, the inhumane treatment of vulnerable populations and the constant destruction of our planet’s resources are all alluded to. The musical aspect makes the story easier to digest through catchy, witty songs and often inappropriate phrases. There’s plenty of room for elbow poking laughs. The story speaks from a human level, and is told with just the right balance of truth and honesty, hilarity, satire, and optimism for an improved world. “Sticking it to the man” is an age-old rock opera mantra, but this show doesn’t hold back any punches delivering a Muhammed Ali punch to the soul. The orchestration is underscored by electric guitar riffs, hip hop beats, and bold genre-mixing innovations. The native Nisenan language is present in over half of the 28 songs and arrangements. This musical is described as a “transformational experience” a “ceremony’ . . . a ‘Native American Hamilton .’

The second program of the day is an online program that begins at 7:00pm with the following film:

Ñuu Kanda
Directed by Nicolás Rojas Sánchez (Mixtec)
We are Nivi Savi, People of the Rain, Mixtecs; a people that disperses like the clouds and returns to our lands to cherish the memory of our ancestors.

Ngen
Directed by Jaime Bernardo Diaz Diaz (Mapuche)
Ngen is a documentary that, through a contemplative and dreamlike journey, shows us the world of Rosa, a Mapuche machi from the town of Fin Fin Boroa, Araucanía Region. Through her story and the observation of her environment, she brings us closer to the deep relationship that exists between her, medicine and non-human beings called Ngen, owners of nature. The short film addresses the life-destruction dichotomy, a constant in the capital-life conflict, showing us another side of the consequences of the impact of the forestry industry in the territory of the wallmapu and that affects the Mapuche communities not only in the ecological dimension but also cultural and ontological.

CANCHIRA, la huella del Comechingón
Directed by Diego Julio Ludueña & Diego Julio (Comechingón)
Canchira, the footprint of the Comechingón is a documentary that tells the current situation of the original peoples of Córdoba and their historical claims, based on testimonies from members of some Comechingona communities of the Province. In Canchira, the footprint of Comechingón, the camera accompanies the protagonists in talks and community spaces in which the history of this town is reconstructed and its existence is continuously claimed from ancient times to the present. The landscape of the city and the mountain landscape become the scene of a story that opposes the official memory of these communities that, organized and struggling, dispute their place in today’s society. In the first person, members of the Comechingona communities of La Toma –from the city of Córdoba–, Timoteo Reyna and Chavascate –both from Villa Cerro Azul–, and Las Palmas –from the Paraje Santa Teresita Sierra de Pocho– put into words the marks that the policy of invisibility of the State left in their family histories and in the possibility of assuming their identity as natives without stigma. The documentary also portrays the current debates based on the struggle for territory and accompanies the protagonists in different instances where the sense of identity and land is disputed.

 

Join us tonight in viewing these films. You can GET YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE. For those who got their tickets for prior programs, you can still use those to view with us.

Our final program is also an online program that take places Tuesday, May 10 at 7:00pm.

We look forward to seeing you there!

FILMS SPOTLIGHT – DAY FIVE

FILMS SPOTLIGHT – DAY FIVE

The Spring 2022 FNFVF continues with another online program. The program begins at 3:00pm. Daylight program films include:

 

Koo (Serpent) directed by Nicolás Rojas Sánchez (Mixtec)
The date 11 death (Year 10 flint), 9 Serpent ‘Eagle Fire’ entered to the temazcal determined to fulfill his last assignment.

 

The Peace Pipeline, directed by Gitz Crazyboy, Tito Ybarra & Keil Orion Troisi (Dene, Blackfoot / Cree)
Comedians and activists Gitz Crazyboy and Tito Ybarra pose as a indigenous energy company sharing plans to reroute Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline through the wealthy white suburbs of Duluth, MN, to more fairly share the risks oil pipelines bring to indigenous lands—with shocking and hilarious results.

 

HipBeat, directed by Samuel Kay Forrest (Cherokee)
A young political activist embarks on a journey of self-discovery while searching for love and anarchy within Berlin’s colourful queer community.

 

The second online program begins at 7:00pm with the following film:

Systemic Injustice, directed by Brad Gerard Gallant (Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation)
Indigenous Mascots are a celebration of North American Indigenous genocide. The persistence of Indigenous Mascots indicates that both Canada and the US are unwilling to come to terms with the criminal actions of their past, the tenuous nature of human rights, and the threat of white supremacy to democracy. Through the documentary and the perspective of my activism, I am trying to understand the forces that allow Indigenous Mascots to persist and the damage caused by mainstream sport racism.

For more info on this film, follow Brad Gallent’s Twitter: @bradggallant

Join us tonight in viewing these films. You can GET YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE. For those who got their tickets for prior programs, you can still use those to view with us. Our next two program programs which take place Sunday, May 8 with a in-person program at the Bezazian Branch Library stating at 2:30pm and an online program at 7:00pm.

We look forward to seeing you there!